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Antec TruePower Trio TP3-550 rev. A2

This model owes its name to its three +12V output lines. But running a little ahead, these lines are “virtual” again. There is nothing unique about them. For example, the above-discussed NeoHE 550 has three +12V output lines, too.

The PSU comes in a black-and-orange cardboard box.

Excepting the nonstandard AR-350, the TruePower Trio is the first model in this review to have a 120mm fan. Such PSUs are traditionally regarded as quiet (although the marketing departments of many manufacturers are already busy touting 140mm fans) but you’ve seen above that a PSU with an 80mm fan can be silent, too. Will the Trio be better in this respect?

Although the UL certificate number on the PSU label belongs to Antec, the actual manufacturer of this PSU cannot be mistaken. The characteristic component layout, shape of the heatsinks and component marking betray Seasonic.

Moreover, the TruePower Tri coincides with the NeoHE in its circuit design, not only in parameters and functionality. It’s got the same PCB and the same components. The different shape of the heatsinks may confuse you at first, but a closer inspection confirms that the two models are in fact identical.

The PSU is cooled with an Adda AD1212HB-A73GL fan (120x120x25mm, 2200rpm).

Interestingly, the TruePower Trio and the NeoHE have different specified currents. The difference is small, though. The TruePower Trio offers an additional 4A across the +5V rail (modern PCs consume but little power from this rail anyway) and an additional 0.5A from the standby source.

 
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