Articles: Cases/PSU
 

Bookmark and Share

(0) 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 ]

Zippy Emacs PSM-6600PE (600W)

Although this is the topmost model of the Gaming Power series, it looks even more like a server power supply than the HP2-6500PE: an unpainted steel case, a punched-out fan grid, lack of any auxiliary elements – there is not even a power on/off switch here. That’s not how we’ve come to think of an expensive power supply for a home PC. Well, you cannot admire the beauty of a highlighted PSU fan anyway unless you have a system case with a transparent panel, so why spend extra money for it? Let’s better talk about things that are really important. I mean the parameters of this power supply.

This model differs internally from the 500W model, although they are based on similar platforms. The PSM-6600PE uses an ML4800CP chip, too, as the main controller.

A steel bracket with a gray insulation on top is fastened to the heatsink with the diode packs. It drew my attention, but I could find no purpose for it other than providing more mechanical robustness to the PSU. It cannot take any great part in cooling the PSU since its thermal conductivity and the thermal conductivity of the PSU’s panel it borders upon is too low.

The specification says the allowable load on the +12V rail has grown more in comparison with the previous model than the total wattage – by 120 watts, to be exact. The load capacity of the +5V rail has diminished to 30A, but you shouldn’t worry about that. As I have repeatedly said in my reviews, modern computers do not consume much power from the low-voltage rails anyway.

 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 ]

Discussion

Comments currently: 0

Add your Comment