Articles: Cases/PSU
 

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The output voltage oscillogram for the low-voltage rails shows short spikes at the moments of switching the inverter. Those spikes are higher than the allowable limits. I guess this is the consequence of using rather poor electrolytic capacitors, which are also not shunted by ceramic capacitors, in the PSU’s output rectifier.

The cross-load diagram looks like those of the AQ series models and worse than the diagram of the GJ model whose +12V voltage didn’t sag that much under load.

The PSU is cooled with an ARX FD1212-S3142E fan.

Its speed is almost constant at low loads but then begins to grow up linearly. Coupled with the not-very-high quality of ARX fans, it makes this PSU average in terms of noisiness.

The PSU is 80% efficient and its power factor is 0.65 on average as is typical of PSU without any power factor correction.

I could write the same about the IP-P450DJ2-0 as about the other InWin PSUs discussed in this review if it were not for one thing. From a practical point of view, it is no better than the cheaper IP-P350GJ2-0. They both have an identical load capacity of the +12V rail while the other rails are much less important for a real-life modern PC. Thus, purchasing the more expensive and allegedly higher-wattage model doesn’t look wise to me.

 
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