Articles: Cases/PSU
 

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Cables and Connectors

The three Super Series models covered in this review all have the same selection of cables and connectors:

  • Mainboard cable with a 24-pin connector (53cm)
  • CPU cable with an 8-pin connector (55cm)
  • CPU cable with a 4+4-pin connector (57cm)
  • Two graphics card cables with 6-pin connectors (57cm)
  • One cable with three Molex connectors (47+15+15cm)
  • One cable with three SATA power connectors (47+15+15cm)
  • Fan’s tachometer cable (60cm)
  • Four sockets for peripheral power cables
  • Two 6-pin sockets for graphics card cables
  • Two 8-pin sockets for graphics card cables

Included with each PSU are:

  • Two graphics card cables with 6-pin connectors (56cm)
  • Two graphics card cables with 8-pin connectors (56cm)
  • Two cables with three Molex connectors and one floppy-drive plug on each (46+15+15+15cm)
  • Two cables with three SATA power connectors on each (46+15+15cm)

There are differences from the Turbo Series. Finally, there are three cables with SATA connectors, which allows using these power supplies without adapters for configurations with a lot of hard disk drives (note that one SATA connector goes to the optical drive and the other SATA plugs on the same cable won’t reach to the HDD cage in most system cases). There should be no problems with graphics cards, either. Each of these PSUs provides a total of six connectors for them, two of the 8-pin and four of the 6-pin variety.

The only downside is that, as I mentioned above, the keys in the connectors of graphics card and peripheral cables are identical, thus allowing inattentive users to plug something wrong.

Specifications

The junior model not only offers a high load capacity of the +12V rail but also a serious 200W on the +3.3V and +5V rails combined. Even though the combined load on the latter two rails is not going to be higher than 50-60W in a modern computer, there is nothing bad in having such a reserve of power.

The +12V power rail is split into four “virtual” output lines with different load capacities.

When the total output power is increased by 150W in the higher-wattage model, and the allowable load on the +12V rail is higher by an appropriate 100W. The other parameters are the same, including the limitations on the individual +12V lines. Therefore I must remind you that the total of the currents of the individual lines does not equal the overall load capacity of the +12V rail. The latter must be specified separately.

And finally, here is the senior model. The total output power is increased by 200W and the allowable load on the +12V power rail is higher by 180W. There are no changes otherwise.

So, there is only one thing I can tell you: the specified parameters of these PSUs match their wattage ratings, the latter coinciding with the number in each model’s name.

UPS Compatibility

Alas, this test was a complete failure. My APC SmartUPS SC 620 was not stable with any of the three PSUs even at a load of 200W only. When the load was 270W or higher, the UPS would shut down, reporting overload, at the moment of switching to the batteries.

 
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