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Compatibility and Installation

Like most other contemporary CPU coolers, GlacialTech Alaska is compatible with all platforms and may be installed onto Socket AM2(+)/AM3, LGA 775/1156/1366 mainboards. The cooler is fastened through the mainboard PCB to a backplate in all cases. The only difference is that you will have to mount two different types of retention brackets onto the cooler base (AMD on the left, Intel on the right):

Note that we mounted the AMD bracket as instructed in the manual – to the bottom of the base. However, when we installed the cooler onto the mainboard like that, there was simply no pressure whatsoever: the cooler was wobbling and moving on top of the CPU heat-spreader. Maybe it was not only the poor design of the retention brackets but also the softness of their material: they were made of aluminum instead of steel. This is how we solved the installation issue:

As you can see, we simply moved the retention brackets from the bottom of the base to the top (the threaded retention holes go through the entire plate). And even though it was not that simple and aluminum brackets bent under pressure, the hold was really strong and reliable.

Luckily, we didn’t experience any installation issues on Intel platform: the retention brackets are higher up in this case and the screws have springs on them:

This is what GlacialTech Alaska looks like installed into a system case with one default fan and two Thermalright TR-FDB fans:

 

The distance between the lowest heatsink plate of GlacialTech Alaska and the base contact surface is 33 mm, but once the cooler is on top of the CPU, the distance to the mainboard PCB is 40 mm. however, if you are using memory DIMMs with tall heat-spreaders, Alaska may potentially interfere with the module in the very first DIMM slot.

Technical Specifications and Recommended Pricing

 
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