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It seems that the same chassis are used to manufacture both these system cases. The placement of the external connectors is identical in them, too.

These connectors are located on the top panel of the case and are covered with a decorative panel. We’re going to meet this designing solution often in this review, but its ergonomics is rather questionable.

Well, the color and material of the case and the shape of the front door may please the eye of an observer, but do not affect the temperatures of the components or the assembly process much. But besides the material and color of the case, there are more and quite important differences between the Tsunami Dream and the Soprano.

 

The installation of 3.5” devices is much better implemented in the Tsunami Dream series than in the Soprano: instead of a single and firmly fixed rack, there are two removable cages which are ready to accommodate your hard drives. Without doubt, this solution allows for a much simpler installation of 3.5” devices.

You won’t need a screwdriver in either case – the included fasteners make it unnecessary:

             

The rails for the drives are the same with both cases, but 3.5” devices are fastened in different ways. With the Soprano, you use plastic rotational locks, and with the Tsunami Dream, traditional thumbscrews.

When it comes to the assembly procedure, these two system case models only differ in the way the drives are mounted. It’s simple to use the rails, which are even marked so that you didn’t confuse right and left ones.

 

But there’s one unpleasant thing as concerns putting optical drives into the case.

You can clearly see it in the enlarged snapshot that the plastic faceplates of the bays are fastened on screws and the top faceplate can’t be moved because of the hinge the front panel hangs on (this is rather strange, considering that users usually put their optical drive into the topmost bay). It’s possible to put the drive into one of the lower bays, but it would mean breaking off an appropriate metal bracket which cannot be put back again in the Soprano. I also didn’t want to unscrew the hinge, so I just bent the faceplate a little using the natural flexibility of plastic and then put the optical drive into its place:

 
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