Articles: Cooling
 

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The mainboard is supposed to be affixed to a special mounting plate:

This intricately-shaped plate is made of aluminum:

Like in an ordinary system case, the mainboard is fastened to the plate with screws:

This seemingly clever solution is not very convenient in practice because you cannot manipulate the mainboard on the plate freely inside the case. I think it is easier to go the traditional way and fasten the mainboard right inside the case.

There’s more than enough space for the components of our test system in the Shark:

I can’t have any complaints about the internal layout of the case – everything is convenient and properly designed.

There is one clip that locks all the expansion cards at once, like in the SViking case.

I already wrote about the disadvantages of this solution above, so I won’t repeat them again.

The exhaust fan is highlighted in blue, while the top curve on the front panel is highlighted with the mild blue light from the built-in LED. If you don’t like such illumination, you can disable it by unplugging the appropriate connector inside the case.

This system case seems to be well-prepared for our tests. Let’s see if it can reveal its full potential in practice.

 
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