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The rear panel looks like the back panel of an ordinary desktop computer positioned vertically and stripped of everything superfluous to achieve maximum compactness.

There are really no extra things here, but the opportunity to use a normal power supply is offered. You can get down to building an all-purpose multimedia/gaming machine right away.

I decided to begin the assembly with the optical drive. I thought I could install it into the bottommost bay with its individual cover by simply turning the front panel down and removing the faceplate, but I was wrong:

The open panel covers about one fifth of the bay’s height, but it’s enough for the drive not to pass through. To solve this problem I had to take more drastic measures and remove the front panel altogether:

This gave me access to all 5.25” and 3.5” bays this system case provides:

It turned out, however, that I took not the easiest way of finding that I shouldn’t have done so. The bottommost bay is just not intended for optical drives, because the drive would hit against an installed mainboard of the mATX form-factor.

Even optical drives with a “shortened” case, like those from Sony or Lite-ON, cannot help here.

You can’t put the drive even into the second bay: it will hang over the top left corner of the mainboard where most manufacturers usually put the mainboard’s power connector. The installed drive would make it impossible to attach the power cable to it.

As a result, I put the drive into the only available place, i.e. into the topmost bay:

 
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