Articles: Cooling
 

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The enclosed feet for the case are a piece of antiquity in a sense – I saw such feet under a server case from Yeon Yang a good dozen years ago. The design hasn’t changed at all since then:

They are easy to install and look quite nice:

But one problem with the feet of old Yeon Yang case has been inherited by this model from Thermaltake. I advise you to put thin adhesive tape between the case and the feet before attaching the latter. If you don’t do that, the case will creak a little at any small vibration. This creaking sound is quiet, but very annoying, and you could spend much time finding its cause.

An interesting fact is that there is no Thermaltake’s traditional engraving of the logotype on the Plexiglas window. There’s only a painted anchor with a logo instead:

I really got a feeling that Thermaltake was not willing to emphasize its authorship of that system case and was trying not to associate its name with it. For example, the company’s website doesn’t mention this model at all. Well, it’s quite natural they do so since this case is rather an average-quality product. To sell well in the $100 and higher price category without a power supply today it is not enough to offer a rectangular window, two preinstalled fans with speed control, a small informational display, and a rather second-rate chassis. All this stuff can be found for less money.

A visual survey is good, but we can only appreciate the capabilities of the system case after we have assembled a computer in it.

 
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