Articles: CPU
 

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As for our today’s heroes, Celeron D CPUs, their clock frequencies haven’t yet exceeded those of the previous generation Celeron processors, so that the top models of both families now work at 2.8GHz. However, the transition of the budget Celeron processors to the new Prescott core may appear much more beneficial than in case of Pentium 4 CPUs. It can be explained by the fact that besides the changes resulting from Prescott’s architectural differences from the previous core, the new Celeron acquired one more very important feature, which has nothing to do with the processor die structure. Unlike the previous generation Celeron processors using 400MHz Quad Pumped Bus, Celeron D will support 533MHz bus. Keeping in mind the fact that the system bus bandwidth has a great influence on the performance of CPUs with NetBurst architecture, we have every right to expect the new Celeron D processors to prove noticeably faster than the predecessors.

Let me sum up all the technical details in a table for you:

 

Intel Celeron D

Intel Celeron

Intel Pentium 4

Intel Pentium 4

Processor core

Prescott

Northwood

Prescott

Northwood

Socket

Socket 478

Socket 478

Socket 478, LGA775

Socket 478

Maximum clock frequency
(as of today)

2.8GHz

2.8GHz

3.6GHz

3.4GHz

Manufacturing technology

0.09micron,
 «strained» silicon

0.13micron

0.09micron,
 «strained» silicon

0.13micron

Number of transistors

125 mln.

55 mln.

125 mln.

55 mln.

Die size

112 sq.mm

131 sq.mm

112 sq.mm

131 sq.mm

L1 cache for data

16KB

8KB

16KB

8KB

L1 cache for instructions

12000 uops

12000 uops

12000 uops

12000 uops

L2 cache

256KB

128KB

1024KB

512KB

Bus frequency

533MHz

400MHz

800MHz

533, 800MHz

SIMD instructions

SSE3/ SSE2/ SSE

SSE2/ SSE

SSE3/ SSE2/ SSE

SSE2/ SSE

Hyper-Threading technology

None

None

Yes

Yes

This way, Celeron D boasts twice as large L1 data cache and L2 cache (16KB and 256KB respectively), support of additional SSE3 SIMD instructions, faster 533MHz bus and all other architectural improvements resulting from a shift to 90nm Prescott core. Among the drawbacks, I should first of all mention the longer pipeline causing notable performance slowdowns while the clock frequency remains unchanged. Later today we will see how this is going to affect the performance in real applications, and in the meanwhile let’s take a closer look at the actual CPU.

The new Celeron D processors are selling in Intel’s common boxes, which are actually a little bit different from those the older Celeron processors were coming in.

I would like to point out right away that all Celeron D processors are marked in a new way: not with the clock frequency, but with the so-called “processor number”, which we have already told you about in our recent review called: LGS775: New CPUs and Chipsets. However, the stickers carry not only the number, but also a couple of formal specifications, such as L2 cache size and bus frequency:

 
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