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PCB Design, Technical Specifications and Cooling System

The graphics adapter we are talking about today uses unconventional but unified PCB layout that we have already discussed in detail in our Palit GeForce GTS 250 1GB review. You shouldn’t be surprised about it, because Palit Microsystems currently owns the Gainward brand.

The two graphics cards differ by the stickers on the cooling system casing, otherwise, they are of identical design. This graphics card design uses shorter PCB than the reference Nvidia solution, but requires two power connectors instead of one, which is undoubtedly excessive for a solution of this class, especially, keeping in mind how little power G92b actually consumes.

The GPU voltage regulator circuitry uses four-phase design with three power transistors in each phase and is based on ON Semiconductor NCP5388 controller. Anpec APW7068 chip is responsible for powering the memory subsystem.

Just like on Palit GeForce GTS 250 1G, Gainward card is equipped with 16 GDDR3 memory chips, 8 on each side of the PCB. In this case, however, they use Hynix chips marked as H5RS1H23MFR-N2C. According to their specifications, these 1Gbit chips work at 2.0V voltage and have 1200 (2400) MHz nominal clock frequency. Gainward GTS250 2048MB has 2GB of total local video memory onboard. The memory working frequency meets Nvidia’s official specs and is 110 (2200) MHz. Together with a 256-bit access bus it provides peak bandwidth of 70.4GB/s.

 
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