Articles: Memory
 

Bookmark and Share

(12) 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 ]

Conclusion

Summing up everything we have just discussed, I would like to say that overclocker system memory such as DDR3 SDRAM managed to make a tremendous jump forward in terms of clock frequencies within a very short period of time. It is true, since early summer and until the end of this fall its speeds grew from 1333MHz to 1800MHz – the first time new memory frequencies have been conquered so rapidly. Of course, Micron is the one who deserves most of the praise for that, as they successfully mastered the production of D9 DDR3 chips that could be so easily overclocked by raising the voltage. These are exactly the chips that are used in most overclocker DDR3 memory modules. Moreover, our tests show that Micron D9 chips keep improving their potential, which will most likely result into even faster solutions than the current performance leaders – DDR3-1800 and DDR3-1866.

However, unfortunately, the dramatic lead forward DDR3 for enthusiasts made this time failed to find adequate support on the chipset side. The currently existing Intel chipsets officially support only DDR3-1333 SDRAM, which means that you can really enjoy all the benefits from the high-speed memory solutions by overclocking your system quite substantially. Of course, this is no problem for overclockers, but at the same time it limits the current application for the DDR3-1800 kits.

So, overclockers should become the main users of high-speed DDR3 modules. This memory is not only nominally the today’s fastest, it does ensure faster speed in applications sensitive to the memory subsystem performance, which we have just seen in our tests. Unfortunately, the currently available DDR3-1800 is not reasonably priced yet. However, we expect the situation to change soon enough, because of cut-throat competition between the overclocker DDR3 memory makers these days.

I would also like to warn you that the conclusions we make today about the application and prospects for overclocker DDR3 SDRAM shouldn’t be applied to regular non-overclocker memory of the same type. As you probably remember, our previous tests revealed that standard DDR3-1066 and DDR3-1333 cannot compete with fast DDR2 SDRAM because of their much higher latency.

So, despite everything we have pointed out here, it definitely makes a lot of sense to equip overclocker systems with DDR3-1800 memory kits we have reviewed today. However, it would be true only if you make sure that the following conditions are met. First, the system bus in these platforms should be overclocked at least to 450MHz. and second, the owners of such systems should be ready to invest quite substantial money into this not very dramatic performance boost.

As for the particular solutions we talked about today, I have to say that although they use the same components, their practical characteristics are still pretty different in the end. Nevertheless, your preference of this or that product from a particular manufacturer will be purely individual and will be based on the price, availability in your area and your liking of a certain brand. Xbit Labs chooses Corsair Dominator TWIN3X2048-1800C7DF G: this memory worked with more aggressive timings than the competitors’ solutions, and besides, it comes with an active cooling system that will fit great into any overclocker system.

 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 ]

Discussion

Comments currently: 12
Discussion started: 11/07/07 08:05:41 AM
Latest comment: 05/01/08 08:24:43 AM

View comments

Add your Comment




Latest materials in Memory section

Article Rating

Article Rating: 6.5714 out of 10
 
Rate this article:
Excellent
Average
Poor