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Configuration and Accessories

The standard shipment of the Latitude D410 includes only a docking station, besides the notebook proper. The docking station enhances the notebook’s functionality but makes it larger. By the way, it is rather strange that the engineers couldn’t find anywhere to put an optical drive into in a notebook of the D410’s dimensions.

The docking station connects to the above-mentioned connector at the bottom of the case. The connect/disconnect procedure is illustrated by the snapshot.

As you see, the case is much thicker with the docking station connected. The face panel seems downright big.

The station adds another Power button on the left panel, a button to disconnect the docking station (without powering the notebook down), and a mechanical eject lever.

The rear panel has transformed dramatically now that the docking station is connected. Some of the notebook’s own connectors are now blocked and some new connectors have appeared, particularly:

  • PS/2 ports for an external mouse and keyboard
  • Parallel LPT port
  • Serial 9-pin COM port
  • Two USB 2.0 ports
  • Headphones output

The network and modem interfaces, D-Sub and power connectors are simply copied here.

The main reason why you may want to use the docking station at all is the optical combo drive which tray is located in the right panel. The drive is removable and you can replace it with a DVD-burner if necessary.

The universal power adapter supports 100-240V, 50-60Hz AC input. It is rather small and has a rubber band to tie the cord up. By the way, the connectors are non-standard, so you will hardly be able to use some third-party power adapter here.

Performance

The performance of the sub-notebook is appropriate to its configuration, and this model never leaves the top five in any subcategory of our tests. I think the Dell Latitude D410 might be appropriate in the hands of people who give presentations or reports. The docking station with its numerous interface ports ensures compatibility with various peripherals, while the additional battery (in a special compartment of the docking station) will improve the total time of autonomous work considerably. Moreover, the main battery alone allows working for about 3 hours at normal use.

Frankly speaking, this sub-notebook is not so very compact. Its dimensions, especially its height, become rather large when the docking station is connected. The only feature typical of a sub-notebook is the screen diagonal, 12 inches. On the other hand, I can picture a situation when the Latitude D410 is used as a mobile computer, while the docking station with the attached network, power and peripheral devices’ cables remains immobile at the work place.

So, if you need many interface ports, high performance and long time of autonomous work (with the additional battery), this model may suit you fine, but you may want to consider other options if compact size and low weight are your priorities.

 
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