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The monitor’s default brightness and contrast are 100% and 80%, respectively. By setting 50% brightness and 53% contrast you get 100nit brightness of white.

The color curves look good at the default settings, with two reservations: the blue component is too intensive and the gamma exponent is higher than it should be (that’s why the curves go below the theoretical one). The last thing can be corrected in the monitor’s menu since you can adjust the gamma compensation in a wide range.

Everything remains the same at the reduced brightness/contrast settings. I want to emphasize the fact that despite controlling brightness with the matrix rather than with the backlight lamps, the monitor reproduces all the colors both at the default and at the reduced brightness.

The color temperature is set up rather inaccurately, just like with the 720B. The difference between the temperatures of different shades of gray is big, exceeding 2000K.

The response time graph looks just like the one of the 720B, save for a more abrupt slump on white-black transitions. That’s why the monitor has a full response time of 10 milliseconds.

The contrast ratio is around 300:1, and it goes down less at the reduced brightness than with the 720B.

Thus, the SyncMaster 721S is nothing else but a version of the 720B with a slightly faster matrix. Other parameters of these two models are near identical. The difference in speed won’t be very conspicuous in practice, either, since it is only registered on black-white transitions. So, the pros and cons of the 712S are the same as those of the 720B.

 
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