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Smooth color gradients are generally reproduced well, but you can see wide cross stripes with some combinations of colors and monitor’s settings. They are not too conspicuous, though. Then, some flicker or noise is visible on dark colors. The viewing angles are wide enough, if we make allowances for the typical “viewing narrowness” of TN-Film matrices.

The brightness and contrast settings are 100% and 50% by default. To achieve a white color brightness of 100 nits I dropped them both to 18%. The monitor controls its brightness through modulation of the power of the backlight lamps at 250MHz frequency.

The color curves aren’t very neat at the default settings. About two thirds of lights are down, especially for the green and red colors. When the contrast setting is reduced (the brightness setting doesn’t affect the color rendition since it is regulated with the lamps rather than with the matrix), the color curves come back to normal (as you can see below, at 18% contrast).

So, the monitor shows a big difference between the color temperatures of white and gray at its default settings:

But this difference diminishes when the contrast setting is reduced because the three color curves begin to converge.

The response time didn’t make it to the specified 14 milliseconds. The graph has the same outline as the ones of many modern 16ms TN+Film matrices: the response time is up to 25 milliseconds on black-gray transitions but goes down suddenly at the ends of the graph, i.e. on black to dark-gray and black to white transitions (and as you remember, the declared response time is measured on black-white transitions of a pixel’s state).

The maximum brightness almost reached the specification, exceeding 300 nits, but I don’t think this is important in this particular case. With its looks and functionality the ScaleoView T17-1 is more of an office rather than home multimedia monitor, but you don’t need more than 150 nits in office for your text-processing tasks. Good contrast is mostly necessary for monitors intended for games and movies in the first place.

Thus, it is hard to say anything special about the T17-1. It is in fact just another typical 17” model without any remarkable features. The only thing it differs from other office models is its high maximum brightness, but it is not necessary in office, while users who need a home multimedia monitor will probably prefer a model with an up-to-date design, a digital input and some other things the T17-1 lacks.

 
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