Articles: Monitors
 

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The default brightness and contrast settings are 100% and 70%. To achieve 100nit brightness of white I set 40% brightness and 52% contrast for analog connection and 40% brightness and 43% contrast for digital connection.

The viewing angles of this monitor are rather wide for this type of the matrix, but cannot compare with the angles of the L172WT.

The color reproduction is good at the default settings and analog connection, except for the traditionally high level of blue.

Alas, as soon as you reduce the brightness, the monitor suffers from the same problem as the L172WT: almost one third of tones become indistinguishable from pure black. It was all the same with the digital connection, so I don’t publish the diagrams – they do not differ much from those taken with the analog connection.

The color temperature setup isn’t perfect. The difference between the real temperatures of white and gray is higher at “6500K” than with the L172WT, but smaller when you select “9300K”. Besides that, the “User” mode at the default settings corresponds to a 6500K temperature.

The response time graph is typical for a TN+Film matrix: over 30 milliseconds at the maximum and a sudden reduction at the rightmost part of the graph which allows the manufacturer to write down a low response time in the specification. As a result, the L173ST will be slower than the L172WT in many cases, although the latter is officially twice slower than the former.

The contrast ratio isn’t good, either. It is lower than that of the L172WT even when the monitor is connected via the digital interface. When the monitor is connected via the analog input, the level of black grows up by a half and the level of white remains almost the same – the combined effect on the contrast ratio is most negative.

Unfortunately, the L173ST has kept the main defects of the above-described L172WT model (I mean the loss of image tones when you choose settings higher or lower than the default ones) and has also acquired additional problems due to the use of a TN+Film matrix (for example, narrower viewing angles). So, if we compare just these two models, the L172WT looks much better, considering they cost almost the same money. But if you do buy an L173ST, I advise you to connect it to the computer via the digital input only. This would ensure a higher contrast ratio of the image. The only advantage of the L173ST over the above-described model is higher resolution (1280x1024 against 1280x768).

 
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