Articles: Monitors
 

Bookmark and Share

(0) 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

ViewSonic VG1930wm

I will end this review with the ViewSonic VG1930wm, which formally belongs to a graphics-processing series of products. This positioning is questionable for a TN-based monitor, though.

The specifications are no different from those of other products in this class. As for the unusually large viewing angles, it is the same as with the above-discussed LG L194WS: the angles may be indeed larger than those of other TN matrixes but you cannot spot this in practice. The high values are arrived at by using a relaxed measurement method. You shouldn’t compare these numbers to the specs of S-IPS or *VA matrixes.

The monitor is elegant thanks to its thin bezel and black color but the wide band of plastic at the bottom (it covers integrated speakers) is not very aesthetic.

As opposed to regular inexpensive models, this monitor has a stand that allows you to rotate the screen around the vertical axis (the monitor and stand rotate all together at that) and adjust the height (from 155 to 230mm) besides just changing the tilt. Alas, the screen is quite high even in the bottommost position. You should acquire a sufficiently high chair to work at this monitor comfortably. To remind you, ergonomics demands that the eyes be at the same level with the top edge of the screen, your eyes looking somewhat downwards.

The back panel offers a standard selection of connectors: analog and digital inputs, an audio input, and a connector of the integrated power adapter. A headphones connector is missing.

There is only one button (Power) on the front panel – it is highlighted with a blue LED. The rest of the monitor’s controls are on the right side of the case. This is rather unhandy: the buttons are way too small, hard to find by touch. Pressed out in the plastic of the front panel, their icons are hard to read. Moreover, the icons follow ViewSonic’s traditional incomprehensible style: two arrows, “1” and “2”. It’s hard to tell what button is responsible for a particular function.

What I did like, there is a dedicated Mute button to turn off the integrated speakers. I guess it is really useful.

This is ViewSonic’s traditional menu. It is not very pretty or handy, but offers every option necessary to set the monitor up.

 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 ]

Discussion

Comments currently: 0

Add your Comment