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NEC MultiSync LCD1970GX

The LCD1970GX is NEC’s first attempt to create a mainstream 19” monitor on a TN+Film matrix (the company used to put such models, e.g. the LCD92VM, into the low-end market segment). The monitor has the new design which our readers may be already familiar with by our review of the LCD2070NX model. I wouldn’t say it differs dramatically from NEC’s older models, but the case has got a sleek rounded outline and the controls are now placed on a separate panel. A joystick is provided instead of buttons for navigating the menu. The rounded angles are a definite plus since NEC’s older models used to look rather bulky and awkward as if hewn out with an axe, but the joystick is not such an indisputable advantage because I’ve heard many users complaining about it and I’ve noticed it malfunctioning, too. I should acknowledge, however, that the joystick in our sample of the monitor worked well.

The LCD1970GX is actually being ousted from the market by newer models with response time compensation, and it’s for the comparison’s sake that I’m interested in testing it.

The monitor’s matrix has a glossy coating with a tremendous reflection capacity. I guess this monitor will be ideal for people who want to be aware of the boss sneaking up to them from behind to check if they’re not wasting the company’s Internet traffic for some fun. But if you’ve got light sources behind your back, this monitor cannot suit you at all. The reflections on the screen will be disturbing at work, not to mention when you’re watching movies or playing games.

The monitor’s base allows adjusting its height within 65 to 170 millimeters from the desk to the screen bottom. The tilt of the screen can also be adjusted, but the portrait mode is unavailable.

The monitor has analog and digital inputs, and a 4-port USB hub. I’d like to remind you that the USB interface is used in modern LCD monitors exclusively for the hub. The monitor itself doesn’t need it because the DDC/CI channel of the ordinary video interface (D-Sub or DVI) is used for management purposes (some CRT monitors used to be managed from Windows via USB). The monitor has an integrated power adapter.

As I said above, the controls are placed on a separate panel below the monitor’s case, and a 4-position joystick is prominent among them.

 
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