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The monitor has 100% brightness and 50% contrast by default. To achieve 100-nit brightness of white I chose 25% brightness and 28% contrast. Color gradients are reproduced well at the default settings, but solid-color bands become discernable in them at reduced values of contrast. They are not very conspicuous, though.

The backlighting is normal, but you can see in the dark that the top and bottom of the screen are a little lighter than the middle.

The gamma curves look almost the same as they did on the 1970GX, except that the gamma value is a little lower than necessary, making the image somewhat whitish. The drawback I noticed with the 1970GX – its overstated default contrast – can be observed here, too. You can cure this by lowering the contrast setting in the monitor’s menu from 50% to 45% or even a little lower.

The monitor’s color temperature modes are set up well for its class, except for cold tones: the temperature of white is lower than that of different levels of gray when you select 7500K or higher. The sRGB mode gives you a perfect setup, though.

The monitor uses a TN+Film matrix with response time compensation. Its speed is overall good, except for a few transitions between light tones that may take as long as 21 milliseconds. The averaged response time is 5.9 milliseconds, which is higher than the BenQ FP93GX’s, but the specified response time of the 90GX2 is higher, too.

There are RTC artifacts, but not too serious. The average error amounts to 11.7% with two peaks of 70% (on light tones, when transitioning from the lighter to the darker tone).

The monitor has an excellent contrast ratio and an even higher maximum brightness than the 1970GX has. So, I can’t have any complaints about its brightness/contrast characteristics.

Thus, the NEC MultiSync 90GX2 is a worthy successor to the 1970GX, with similar characteristics, but a considerably lower response time. Unfortunately, the stand has been simplified in comparison with the 1970GX and now doesn’t allow adjusting the height of the screen. This monitor is equally suitable for gamers and home users who want to have a good-quality and well-configured product. The only thing that may set you aback is the monitor’s price of over $500. This sum can buy you a good monitor on a PVA or MVA matrix with RTC which is going to be better than the 90GX2 with its TN+Film matrix in every parameter except for response time. You can also buy an inexpensive 20” monitor on TN+Film for this money. For example, the rather good monitor Acer AL2017 with a 1400x1050 matrix has a considerably lower price than the mentioned $500.

 
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