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ViewSonic VG920

ViewSonic positions its entire VG series as LCD monitors for processing complex graphics and for playing games. The positioning is strange in both respects. For example, the VG920 model uses a TN+Film matrix without response time compensation which makes it an equally poor choice for processing graphics and for playing dynamic games. The manufacturer touts the 8ms matrix as being very fast, but we know that this 8 milliseconds is only achieved on black-to-white transitions on TN+Film matrixes. Only RTC-capable monitors are really fast, but their specified response is 2 or 4 milliseconds, but not 8 (by the way, the number alone is an indication that the VG920 lacks response time compensation).

The monitor’s appearance is modest, yet eye-pleasing. The case is painted a matte black with silver speakers underneath. The panel with the speakers is slanted in such a way that they are facing downward at an angle (it can be seen more clearly in the next snapshot). This is of course wrong from the point of view of “serious” acoustic systems (speakers have a directional diagram of their own), but with the sound quality the monitor’s speakers provide it is indeed unimportant where they are directed at. Such speakers are only good for reproducing the simple sounds from Windows, ICQ, etc.

The base allows changing the tilt of the screen and turning the monitor around its vertical axis. With its rather limited functionality it is at least differs visually from the clumsy and tall stands of some low-end monitors from ViewSonic, e.g. the VX724 and VX924 (for details see our article called LCD Panels with Response Time Compensation: 7 Monitors Reviewed).

The monitor has an integrated power adapter, analog and digital inputs, and an audio input. It lacks a headphones output.

It’s not very easy to control this monitor. The onscreen menu remembers the option you changed last, but this is the only good point about it. The buttons are made not very well. It’s hard to sense them by the touch. The Down button is placed above Up for some reason. The Menu/Exit and Select buttons are traditionally for ViewSonic labeled as “1” and “2”, which only adds more confusion.

Quick access is provided to the brightness and contrast settings (the Up and Down buttons), to sound volume adjustment and to switching between the inputs (the “2” button).

 
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