Articles: Monitors
 

Bookmark and Share

(0) 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 ]

By default, the monitor has 100% brightness and 70% contrast. To achieve 100-nit brightness of white I selected 55% brightness and 60% contrast. Color gradients are reproduced by this monitor not perfectly, but acceptably well, and their quality isn’t any worse at reduced values of the contrast setting (which is a common problem with many other monitors).

The gamma curves are acceptable. The monitor reproduces all the tones you expect it to, but not very accurately. The averaged gamma for the blue component is normal, but this curve deflects from the theoretical one rather much through the diagram; the gamma for green is a little too low.

The color temperature is set up well enough, so there is a small difference between the temperatures of white and gray, especially in the most frequently used modes with temperatures of 6500-7500K and whereabouts.

I was left highly satisfied with how response time compensation is implemented in the VP930. Unfortunately, the manufacturer couldn’t get rid of the sudden response time growth on darkest tones which is characteristic of MVA and PVA matrixes (the VP930 employs an MVA matrix made by AU Optronics). But unlike with RTC-less MVA matrixes, the response time quickly goes down to 10-11 milliseconds towards lighter tones, so the monitor proves to be quite suitable for playing games. The averaged response time on all the transitions is 11.5 milliseconds, a little lower than that of the above-described EIZO L778.

The monitor has no RTC artifacts. There’s something like them only on a few transitions, but the maximum error amounts to only 8.9%. The average error is a mere 0.5%.

To tell you the truth, the VP930 with its matrix can be used as an example of an accurate implementation of RTC technology. For example, here is an oscillogram of one of its transitions:

That’s just a picture for a schoolbook: the pixel brightness is growing linearly exactly up to the moment it reaches the necessary level. There is no bend at the end that occurs when the overdrive impulse is turned off sooner than necessary, and the brightness doesn’t go above the necessary level which occurs when the impulse is turned off too late.

Alas, this monitor cannot sport record-breaking contrast/brightness characteristics. Its 190 nits of max brightness is more than enough for work and play under not-very-bright lighting. You’ll only have a problem if you try to watch a movie on this monitor on a sunny day – this is when you need higher brightness and this is why LCD TV-sets typically have a maximum brightness within a range of 350-450 nits, which is considerably higher than PC monitors can usually offer).

So, my overall impression about the ViewSonic VP930 is positive. It’s not something extraordinary, yet can make a good monitor for home and office use. It has a functional stand, accurate setup, good response time without artifacts, and an MVA matrix with large viewing angles. The only drawbacks are its rather unassuming exterior design and a not-very-handy onscreen menu, but I think these are not going to stop you if you are looking for a monitor to work on.

 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 ]

Discussion

Comments currently: 0

Add your Comment