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Quick access – by means of control buttons – is provided to the f-Engine feature (a number of preset modes you can browsed through in a loop) and to selecting the input.

The menu is designed in LG’s classic way. It lacks any extraordinary features, yet is quite handy and user-friendly.

By default, the monitor has 100% brightness and 70% contrast. When the contrast setting is set above 75%, the monitor loses details in lights. To achieve a 100nit brightness of white I reduced the brightness setting to 48% and the contrast setting to 46%. Brightness is controlled by means of pulse-width modulation of the power of the backlight lamps at a frequency of 260Hz.

Just like the previous monitor from LG in this review, the L1960TR correctly reproduces color gradients at any brightness/contrast settings and has no problems at reproducing dark colors.

The gamma curves are close to the theoretical ones at the default settings, but their shape changes at lower contrast values.

This is how they look at the settings that yield a 100nit white. The contrast setting is reduced to 46% here. You can see that the green curve goes too low and the shape of the blue curve is very uneven. It means that colors won’t be correct at low contrast values, even though the distortion won’t be too great.

The monitor’s color temperature setup is better than with the previous model. The difference between temperatures of different levels of gray is within 1000K rather than 2000-3000K. This is not an ideal accuracy, especially in the 9300 mode, but quite sufficient for a common, not very fastidious, user.

The monitor’s average response time of 3.1 milliseconds with a maximum of 7 milliseconds makes it one of the fastest LCD monitors available. It is 50% faster than the Flatron L1900R.

The RTC error is not exactly small, but acceptable. It is 11.8% on average with a maximum of 34%. This means that RTC artifacts may be noticeable, but they are smaller than on the ASUS monitors that have the same response time. What is interesting, the error is the biggest on transitions into light tones while transitions into dark tones are performed with minimum or no error.

The L1960TR’s contrast ratio is very good as TN matrixes go. It is 300:1 or higher at most settings.

Thus, the Flatron L1960TR is a good mainstream monitor with a fast matrix, good contrast ratio, and no problems with color gradients. This makes it a good inexpensive model for home use which is surely going to be popular among people who don’t want to pay extra for a fanciful exterior design and cannot afford a monitor with a larger diagonal, yet do not want to use downright low-end models, either.

 
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