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This is a typical menu of inexpensive monitors from Acer: simple, not very pretty, but quite user-friendly. It offers a regular selection of settings, without any special options.

By default, the monitor has 77% brightness and 50% contrast. When the contrast setting is increased higher than the default, the monitor loses details in lights. To achieve a 100nit brightness of white I dropped the brightness setting to 25% and the contrast setting to 24%. The monitor controls its brightness through modulation of the power of the backlight lamps at a frequency of 266Hz.

Color gradients do not look striped whatever settings you choose, but dark halftones become indistinguishable from each other on your reducing the contrast setting to 10% and lower.

The gamma curves are surprisingly good for such an inexpensive model. There is a certain misbalance of colors, but without gross defects. The curves retain their shape at the reduced brightness/contrast, and all color tones are reproduced normally.

The color temperature setup is depressing, however. There are only two temperature modes, except for a manual mode, and both are set up shabbily. The temperature of dark halftones is very high, differing from the temperature of white by a few thousand degrees. You can easily see this with your own eyes, without any instruments. The Warm mode is hardly really warm: white looks more or less normal but the dark tones are obviously cold at 9300K and higher.

If matrixes with response time compensation did not exist, the monitor’s speed might be considered good at an average of 13.7 milliseconds with a maximum of 28.4 milliseconds. But of course this monitor can’t stand competition with RTC-enabled models. It is many times slower than them.

The monitor’s brightness and contrast parameters are average for matrixes of its type. The contrast ratio does not reach 300:1 in any mode.

Thus, I can find nothing very interesting about the Acer AL1916. It has all the traits of a model that was stripped of everything to be made as cheap as possible. Its gamma curves are set up surprisingly well for a monitor of its price range, but the color temperature is set too high and the contrast ratio is just average. This model may be appropriate as an inexpensive office or home monitor for working with text documents thanks to its price which is almost as low as that of 17” monitors.

 
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