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We continue our roundups of 19" LCD monitors with a native resolution of 1280x1024 pixels and an aspect ratio of 5:4. Although such products have been relegated to the bottom market segment, new models are still being released on a regular basis. Perhaps one of them is just what you’ve been looking for?

Most of the newer models, except for cheapest office-oriented ones, feature Response Time Compensation (RTC) technology that improves the matrix’s speed and eliminates the notorious “ghosting” effect. The so-called dynamic contrast technology is becoming ever more widespread as well. When it is enabled, the monitor is automatically adjusting the level of backlight brightness to make the whole image darker or lighter depending on the prevalence of light or dark colors in the current image. The resulting dynamic contrast ratio can be calculated by multiplying the static contrast ratio by the brightness adjustment range available in this mode.

Testing Methodology

Follow this link for a description of our testing methodology.

Acer AL1916Fsd

The specified response time of 2 milliseconds GtG is indicative of an RTC-enabled TN matrix. Acer should be given credit for specifying the viewing angles honestly, as measured by a contrast ratio reduction to 10:1 rather than to 5:1 as many other manufacturer do to make the specified numbers look better in comparison with the specifications of other matrix types.

This monitor resembles many of its kinsmen produced by the same brand: a plain gray case on a simple plastic stand that allows adjusting the tilt of the screen only. The stand isn’t very steady. The monitor is wobbling when you are pressing its buttons and can topple over if you push it too strong accidentally.

The case is thin notwithstanding the integrated power adapter.

The stand can be replaced with a VESA mount if necessary.

You’ve got a standard selection of connectors here: an analog D-Sub, a digital DVI-D, and a power connector.

The control buttons are centered under the screen on a small ledge. Quick access is provided to the auto-adjustment feature and to selecting one of the preset image modes. The latter feature is called Empowering technology and its modes vary in the values of brightness and contrast. Thus, the Standard mode has 77% brightness and 50% contrast and the Text mode has 44% and 50%, respectively. The Graphics mode has 97% and 60%, and the Movie mode has 77% brightness and 56% contrast.

This is a standard onscreen menu of Acer monitors: simple, user-friendly and with a typical selection of setup options.

The monitor’s default brightness and contrast are set at 90% and 61%, respectively. To achieve a 100nit brightness of white I reduced the brightness setting to 60% and the contrast setting to 57%. Brightness is controlled by the matrix. The backlight is uniform, without conspicuous irregularities.

Color gradients are reproduced correctly, without any banding. Dark grays do not merge into black whatever contrast value you select while light grays can be differentiated from white even when the brightness and contrast settings are both at 100%.

 
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