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The gamma curves look good at the default settings. They lie close to the theoretical ones, but have a slightly lower value of gamma than necessary. At the reduced contrast the curves retain their shape and position, so the monitor won’t have any problems displaying darkest halftones.

The color temperature modes are set up poorly in the L1952TR. The difference of temperatures is over 1000K in almost each of the available modes, darker tones being colder than lighter ones.

The color gamut is standard: a wider area of green than in the sRGB space and a slightly displaced position of the red point.

Typically for a modern fast RTC-enabled matrix, this monitor’s got an average response time of 3.1 milliseconds with a maximum of 7 milliseconds.

The level of RTC errors is low at 9.2% on average, which is a good result for a TN matrix. The maximum error is 32%, meaning that RTC artifacts won’t be noticeable on this monitor unless you are specifically looking for them.

The monitor’s max brightness and contrast ratio are acceptable and will satisfy most users. The level of black is rather high, though.

So, the LG 1952TR is a good gaming monitor for those who are ready to put up with its anti-ergonomic controls, difficult-to-detach stand and rather high color temperature dispersion. Added to this list of drawbacks are the traditionally narrow viewing angles of TN matrixes, but this thing is common among most of the monitors reviewed in this article.

 
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