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LG Flatron L1953TR

Comparing the specs, this model differs from the L1952TR with its different specified value of dynamic contrast. I will compare their real parameters, now that I’ve got the opportunity. By the way, the L1952TR can be found less often in shops than the more widespread L1953TR.

The two models are practically indistinguishable except for the text on the front panel. They’ve got the same shapes, equally inconvenient controls, and stands that are hard to detach. And they’ve got the same set of connectors as well: analog and digital inputs, and a connector of the integrated power adapter. Each monitor provides quick access to the f-engine modes, to the auto-adjustment feature and to selecting the input. Their onscreen menus are identical, too.

The specific settings are going to be different in the two models, so I will describe them in more detail.

By default, the L1953TR has 100% brightness and 70% contrast. To achieve a 100nit brightness of white I selected 43% brightness and 41% contrast. Brightness is controlled by means of pulse-width modulation of the power of the backlight lamps at a frequency of 260Hz. The backlight is uniform overall.

Color gradients look striped on this monitor. Darks are distinguishable from black at any value of contrast. Lights merge into white at a contrast of 90% and higher.

 
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