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Acer AL1951D

The Acer AL1951D’s specification is exactly alike to the previous model’s – this is yet another LCD monitor based on an RTC-enabled TN matrix. But it has a dramatically different exterior design and built-in speakers.

As opposed to the previous model, this has a more inspiring appearance with its combination of a stern black case and a small silvery stand. Unfortunately, the stand is not perfect. It is not very stable, although better than the AL1916’s stand in this respect, and raises associations with such a typical office tool as a hole puncher. The speakers are positioned at the bottom part of the case and directed down and backwards. This worsens the quality and volume of the sound, but the integrated speakers sound poorly anyway, so this worsening doesn’t matter much. Their main purpose is to reproduce system sounds and they do their job quite well.

The monitor’s case is very thin due to the unusual position of the speakers and the power adapter being external. Unfortunately, the monitor’s stand is limited in functionality. You can only adjust the tilt of the screen. The photograph shows a headphones connector on one side of the stand.

The non-detachable stand cannot be substituted for a VESA mount. You won’t be able to hang this monitor on the wall.

The connectors are placed at the back of the stand: analog and digital inputs, and a connector for the external power adapter. It is good that the cables lie right on the desk – you don’t have to fasten them somehow and they are practically invisible.

The control buttons are placed on the top of the stand. The Power button differs from the others, although is designed alike to them. Quick access is provided to the automatic image adjustment, to selecting the input and to adjusting the sound volume.

The onscreen menu is a copy of the previous monitor’s menu.

By default, the monitor’s got 90% brightness and 61% contrast. To achieve a 100nit brightness of white I reduced the brightness setting to 56% and the contrast setting to 58%. Pulse-width modulation was not spotted, so this monitor’s brightness must be controlled by the matrix. The backlight is generally uniform, without obvious irregularities.

Color gradients are reproduced correctly, without banding. Dark halftones do not merge into black as you are reducing the contrast setting. When the contrast is above 75%, lights merge into white.

 
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