Articles: Monitors
 

Bookmark and Share

(0) 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

The gamma curves look good at the default settings although have different shapes. The characteristic bend of the red curve in the top part of the diagram is indicative of a too high level of contrast while the other curves are free from this defect. It doesn’t cause any serious problems as concerns reproducing halftones. When the contrast is reduced, the curves remain almost as they are at the default settings, improving their shapes but slightly.

As for the color temperature setup, the Normal and Reddish modes are almost ideal, so you may want to use them in the first place. The other modes have a temperature dispersion of 2000K and dark halftones have a noticeable bluish hue.

The monitor’s color gamut is perfectly standard with a minor defect relative to the sRGB space in the red point area.

The term “fast TN matrix” describes exactly what this monitor is. Its average response time is 2.8 milliseconds and its longest transition takes only 6 milliseconds. Such numbers are becoming standard for this type of monitors.

The level of RTC errors is low. The average is 8.1% with a maximum of 25%. It means that RTC artifacts will be virtually invisible for a majority of users. You will only spot a white trail behind a dark object moving on a gray background if you are purposely looking for it. Considering the results of the namesake model without the plus in its name (its maximum RTC miss was as high as 200%), BenQ has done a good job correcting the errors, in a literal sense.

The brightness/contrast parameters are normal: a 0.75nit black and a contrast ratio of 200:1. The maximum brightness doesn’t make it to 200 nits, yet it is still quite enough unless you are going to put the monitor under bright daylight. Funnily enough, the plus-less predecessor of this model had somewhat better results in our brightness/contrast tests (click here to view the chart).

So, the BenQ FP93G X+ is a good monitor for people who don’t care much about the external decorations and who don’t need extensive setup options. BenQ has made certain improvements since the precursor model, yet there are still some points in this product you may have gripes about.

 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 ]

Discussion

Comments currently: 0

Add your Comment