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The menu is the same as in the BenQ monitor described in the previous section.

The monitor has 90% brightness and 50% contrast by default. Reducing them both to 47% results in a 100nit brightness of white. The monitor controls its brightness by means of backlight modulation at a frequency of 210Hz.

Color gradients are reproduced correctly. Dark halftones are distinguishable from each other at any value of contrast, but I don’t recommend you to increase the contrast setting at all because, like on the previous model, lights merge into white at a contrast of 55% and higher.

The red and green gamma curves look good but the blue one is shaped differently – its gamma value is obviously too high. This color reproduction is not accurate.

The gamma curves improve somewhat when the contrast is reduced.

The color temperature setup is exactly alike to that of the previous model: very accurate Normal and Reddish modes and a big difference between the halftones in the Bluish and User modes.

The color gamut is the same as in other modern LCD monitors that don’t use backlight lamps with improved phosphors. It is somewhat larger than sRGB in greens, but smaller in reds.

The response time average is 13.9 milliseconds; the maximum is 34 milliseconds. It is a normal result for a matrix without Response Time Compensation. Once again I want you to note that monitors with a specified response time of 5 milliseconds ISO are many times, but not by a little, slower than monitors with a specified response time of 2 or 4 milliseconds GtG.

The contrast ratio is normal. It doesn’t reach 300:1 as on the previous model.

The BenQ FP93G S almost coincides with the FP91G +U in all of its characteristics. It has a somewhat higher response, somewhat worse gamma curves and contrast ratio, but these are all negligible differences you can hardly catch with a naked eye. The difference in the case design, the availability of a digital input, and the lack/presence of banding in color gradients are going to matter more for the end-user. It’s up to you to decide what you want to have in your monitor if you choose between the two models from BenQ, but their other characteristics are rather mediocre.

 
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