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The Night View mode makes the S-shaped section of the blue curve even more conspicuous and adds a similar defect to the green curve. The red curve is still sagging as before. Note that the left part of the blue curve is flat, meaning that dark-blue halftones are indistinguishable from each other.

The Scenery mode is a weird mix of all the defects we have seen above: a too high green curve, dark-blues merging into black, an S-shaped section in the middle of the blue curve, and a sagging red curve.

Easy to see, the modes do differ from each other and the onscreen image is indeed different in each of them, but the colors are far from being accurate in every Splendid mode.

The color temperature setup isn’t very accurate, either. There is a temperature dispersion of over 1500K in every mode, and up to 5000K in the Cool and User modes. Darks are noticeably colder than lights.

Note also that the sRGB mode differs by almost 1000K from the required 6500K even on white.

The color gamut of the ASUS VW191s is typical for a majority of modern LCD monitors. It is somewhat larger than sRGB in greens but smaller in reds.

This monitor doesn’t differ much from other RTC-less monitors in terms of speed. Its response average is 15.6 milliseconds with a maximum of 32 milliseconds. This is quite a poor result when you compare it with the speed of TN matrixes with Response Time Compensation.

The brightness and contrast ratio aren’t record-breaking, but sufficient for everyday use.

Returning once again to the Splendid feature, here’s what happens to the brightness and contrast ratio when you enable it:

You can see that both the level of black and the brightness of white vary between the modes and the contrast ratio changes accordingly. The Theater and Game modes make the monitor less bright, although the brightness remains sufficiently high unless you are working in a very brightly lit room. The Night View mode increases the brightness of darks, which lowers the contrast ratio twofold in comparison with what we have at the default settings, but that’s just what this mode is meant for – playing games with a very dark picture.

So, this monitor has nothing to astonish you with. It has good gamma curves and a neat exterior design, but the sloppy color temperature setup and slow matrix do not make the VW191s competitive against best representatives of the 19” class. It can be a good choice for an undemanding user who wants an inexpensive monitor for processing text.

 
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