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ViewSonic VA1903wb

The last model in this review is an inexpensive model with a widescreen matrix. The ViewSonic VA1903wb is similar to the VA903b model we tested earlier.

There’s nothing special in the specifications. There is neither Response Time Compensation nor dynamic contrast here.

The monitor’s exterior is stern: a neat black case stands on a black plastic base. The impression is somewhat spoiled by the plain-looking buttons placed at the middle bottom of the front panel.

The stand permits to adjust the tilt of the screen. That’s the only adjustment option available to you. Like with the other models discussed above, you can replace the stand with a VESA mount – you’ll find the necessary mounting holes under the caps on the back panel.

The monitor has an analog input and a connector of the integrated power adapter.

The control buttons are accompanied with barely readable labels pressed out in the plastic of the case. The labels are not very comprehensible, though. This is ViewSonic’s traditional set of “1”, “2”, and two arrows. The Power button is rather inconveniently placed in the center and highlighted with a green LED at work. Quick access is provided to the auto-adjustment and to the brightness and contrast settings.

This is a typical menu of ViewSonic monitors. It is quite ordinary in terms of design and convenience, but offers all the necessary setup options. A special feature, the monitor locks the brightness and contrast settings when you select the sRGB mode but doesn’t set them to certain predefined values. It just keeps the values you’ve selected before enabling that mode.

 
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