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NEC MultiSync LCD2070WNX

The name of this monitor can brings forth associations with the old and widely reputed LCD2070NX model, but this is a false trail. The 2070NX used to be a mainstream monitor on an S-IPS matrix, while the 2070WNX is an inexpensive product on a widescreen TN+Film matrix. There’s only one parameter that looks interesting in the specs: the unusual response time of 10 milliseconds (the ISO mark means that the response is measured as a total time it takes to switch from black to white and back again, i.e. according to the ISO13406-2 standard). I’ve seen a lot of 12ms and 8ms matrixes, but it’s the first time I see a 10ms one. However, the mention of the ISO13406-2 standard implies that the monitor doesn’t support response time compensation and is unlikely to impress us with its speed.

The viewing angles specified in the table are measured by a contrast drop to 5:1. If the common method of measuring by a contrast drop to 10:1 is used (unfortunately, this method has recently been used only for matrix types other than TN+Film), these angles will get narrower to quite an unimpressive 140/125 degrees.

The monitor resembles the above-described 20WGX2, but the buttons are painted a different color. Otherwise, it is the same large case of NEC’s new monitors. It doesn’t look bulky thanks to the rounded angles.

The stand has changed a little. It has become more robust and now permits to adjust the height of the screen. The adjustment range is 11 centimeters wide. In the lowest position, the screen is indeed very low, which is suitable for owners of tall desks (it is recommended that the top edge of the screen be not higher than the level of the user’s eyes). We’ve got a kind of paradox here: the entry-level 2070WNX is designed better than the considerably more expensive 20WGX2!

The monitor is equipped with analog and digital inputs, and a 4-port USB hub. Two ports of this hub are on a side panel of the case (for plugging in flash drives, for example) and two more are at the back, next to the rest of the connectors (for connecting a keyboard, mouse, or card-reader). The power adapter is internal.

Like with the 20WGX2, the monitor’s controls are grouped into a single block under the screen. There are four buttons and a joystick here. The latter misbehaved as usual, not quite accurately processing a rightward press (this direction seems to be a common problem with NEC’s joysticks; at least I’ve had it on a number of samples in a row).

 
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