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ViewSonic VA2012w

We’ll get back to the bottom price range to wind this review up. The ViewSonic VA2012w has a widescreen TN+Film matrix without response time compensation. Costs a mere $430.

The monitor doesn’t have eye-catching looks. It rivals the Acer AL2017 in design and not more: a silver case with rather wide margins around the screen, a simple stand, integrated speakers that make the case larger, but not any more beautiful (the simple design solution implemented in the Samsung 215TW – the speakers are sunken into the case by one centimeter – looks dramatically better).

The stand allows adjusting the tilt of the screen only. It can be replaced with a VESA-compatible mount.

The monitor has analog and digital inputs (the latter is a definite plus for the native resolution of 1680x1050!), a line input for the integrated speakers and a built-in power adapter.

The monitor’s controls are placed in a row beneath the screen and are designed rather inconveniently: small, shiny, with pressed-out labels that are rather hard to read. Moreover, ViewSonic uses numbers (1 and 2) to label buttons that are elsewhere, i.e. in other monitors, referred to as Menu and Select – perhaps to fit the labels into the buttons. To my mind, it would be handier for the user to have the labels painted in black above the corresponding buttons.

The quick access buttons control the integrated speakers (three buttons in total: Volume Up, Volume Down and Mute), adjust the brightness and contrast settings and switch between the inputs.

 
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