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ViewSonic VP2030b

This monitor has a classic aspect ratio of 4:3 and an MVA matrix. The monitors from Dell and Philips discussed above are based on S-PVA and S-IPS matrixes, respectively. So, we seem to have all matrix manufacturing technologies here except for TN. But as I wrote above, monitors with an aspect ratio of 4:3 suit better for work and TN is not the best choice for that.

So, the VP2030b employs an MVA matrix with Response Time Compensation. The manufacturer specifies the response time as measured according to both ISO and GtG methods. The viewing angles are somewhat smaller than the 178 degrees modern VA-based monitors are usually declared to provide, but this shouldn’t worry you. They are anyway much wider than those of TN matrixes just because they are measured by the reduction of the contrast ratio to 10:1.

This monitor has a stern neat case made from dark gray plastic. Its stand is very large and long-legged.

The stand permits to adjust the height (within 85 to 215mm from the desk to the bottom edge of the matrix) and tilt of the screen and to turn it into portrait mode or around the vertical axis. In the latter case the vertical pole of the stand is the only rotating thing; the base remains motionless.

The stand can be replaced with a standard VESA mount.

The monitor’s got analog and digital inputs, an integrated power adapter and a 4-port USB hub. The latter’s ports are all on the back panel too, so they are only good for permanently attached devices like keyboard, mouse or web-camera, but not for USB flash drives. It’s just difficult to plug a drive blindly into the port.

The control buttons – small squares painted the color of the case – are centered under the screen. There are two problems with them. The icons pressed out in the plastic are too small and barely visible. You can’t read them at all in semidarkness. And second, ViewSonic prefers the rather perplexing numerical designations of “1” and “2” to text labels like ‘Menu” and “Exit”. You only learn what those “1” and “2” mean when you enter the onscreen menu.

 
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