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The monitor’s color gamut is perfectly standard. It coincides with sRGB in blues, smaller than it in reds and larger in greens.

 

The average white brightness uniformity is 5.4% with a maximum deflection of 16.9%. For black, the numbers are 5.5% and 14.5%, respectively. The pictures above show that there is a brighter horizontal band in the center and three brighter spots at the top and bottom in both cases.

The gamma curves are acceptable at the default settings but sag in the second half of the diagram, deflecting from the theoretical curve.

The reproduction of colors improves at the reduced settings: the three curves go in a single group, almost coinciding with the ideal curve.

The response time average is 5.4 milliseconds (GtG) with a maximum of 19.3 milliseconds. The 2232BW is not the fastest monitor available, yet it’s far faster than RTC-less models. Interestingly, Response Time Compensation doesn’t work for black-to-gray transitions and you can see a barely visible “ghosting” effect at ordinary work (for example, when dragging about a window with text).

The average level of RTC errors is 9.3%. That’s normal for this matrix type, but not impressive in comparison with the superb results of the ASUS VW222u (discussed above). RTC-provoked artifacts are going to be inconspicuous at work but may be noticeable in games.

The color temperature setup is quite accurate. The difference between the temperatures of different grays is not higher than 1000K in any mode. And if you disregard white (you can do so if you select a contrast value lower than the default one), the difference is within 500K even. The monitor doesn’t offer really warm modes, but most users are going to be satisfied with Warm or Normal mode.

The contrast ratio is good, over 400:1.

Like the above-discussed monitors from Samsung, the 2232BW offers five preset MagicBright modes. I’d say the Text mode is rather too bright – a brightness of 80-110 nits is considered optimal for reading text, depending on ambient lighting. I guess most users will set the monitor up manually for working with text and will switch to the MagicBright modes for photographs, movies or games. I have no other complaint about this feature.

I am overall pleased with the SyncMaster 2232BW. It’s not exceptional in its parameters but I didn’t find serious flaws about it, either. It’s a balanced model that meets all the requirements a home monitor must meet.

Highs:

  • Appealing exterior design
  • Appropriate setup of MagicBright modes
  • Fast matrix
  • Good color reproduction setup

Lows:

  • Doesn’t support VESA mounts

Recommended usage:

  • Text-based applications (documents, spreadsheets, Internet)
  • Viewing and simple editing of photographs
  • Movies and games (including those that require a fast matrix)
 
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