Articles: Monitors
 

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The monitor’s color gamut is standard for a model with backlight lamps with old-type phosphors. It is smaller than the sRGB color space in reds and larger than it in greens.

 

The average white brightness uniformity is 5.7% with a maximum deflection of 19.0%. For black brightness, the average and maximum are 7.4% and 20.5%, respectively. There is a usual X-shaped brighter pattern on black and darker edges of the screen on white.

As I noted above, the monitor’s contrast is too high at the default settings, which is perfectly obvious from the gamma curves that reach saturation in the right part of the diagram. As a result, light halftones are indistinguishable: you see a white spot instead of them.

The curves become normal if you just lower the contrast setting by 5 steps in the monitor’s menu. They have a good shape too, except that the blue curve goes somewhat lower than the others.

The curves rise up a little when the contrast setting is reduced further, yet the overall picture remains unchanged: both darks and lights are reproduced correctly through a contrast range of 0 to 75%.

The response time average is 4.6 milliseconds (GtG) with a maximum of 11 milliseconds. Not a record-breaking result, it still demonstrates the operation of the Response Time Compensation mechanism. If you compare this to the MW221u, which is declared to have RTC but is not found by me to have it, you can see the VW222u is almost thrice as fast.

 
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