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Sony SDM-S71R

One more – after the NEC models – display with a fast matrix. Its specifications: 260nit brightness, 500:1 contrast ratio, 160 degrees viewing angles (both horizontal and vertical), 16ms response time (12ms rise and 4ms fall).

The design of the display is pretty elegant, but what else did you expect from Sony? The control buttons are placed on the side, like in Samsung 171S. The menu is very user-friendly; brightness and contrast are quick-accessed. Auto-adjustment doesn’t need a quick button as it is performed automatically each time the resolution or the refresh rate change.

Regrettably, the real viewing angles fall short of the specifications. When you view the screen from aside at an angle of 60 degrees or more, the image looks yellowish. When viewed from below at an angle of 45 degrees or more, it appears dark. And if you look at the screen from above (30-40 degrees) there will be a wide dark band across the screen. So, the real viewing angles are much more modest than specified… It looks similar to NEC LCD1760NX. Seems like both displays are based on the same, or very similar, matrices.

Brightness is rather low (especially after the above-described Samsungs). I set brightness and contrast to 45% at work.

The display did a little worse than the specs claimed: 15ms pixel rise time and 13ms pixel fall time. Still, these values are very nice. If only the viewing angles were wider…

The backlight lamp modulates at 280Hz, but the flicker is nearly absent at the maximum brightness of the backlight (it is adjusted independently). Moreover, you can see fluctuations with the refresh rate frequency in the oscillograms. Again, their amplitude is too small to be taken into consideration.

Pixel rise time

Pixel fall time

 
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