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My visual impressions from the matrix were very good: the viewing angles are nearly perfect and the response time seems quite small (especially according to the standards of relatively slow 19” matrixes).

The color curves cannot boast the same neatness as those of the previous model. Blue and green are too high in the middle of the range. Blue becomes normal to the end, but red is high and green is quite domineering. The result is obvious: the light part of the grayscale has a noticeable tincture of green.

The red color is rendered ideally at 100nit brightness, while green and blue have “humps”, which don’t coincide, to the bargain. It means some of the gray tones are slightly bluish, while others – a bit greenish.

Notwithstanding the good visual impression, the measured response time was about 10ms higher than specified by the manufacturer. Curiously enough, the brightness and contrast settings affected the response time unpredictably: pixel rise and pixel fall times would alternately have the biggest share in the total. At default settings, they were equal.

Pixel rise time

Pixel fall time

This model demonstrated worse contrast ratio than its predecessor, although the manufacturer promised this parameter to be the same by both displays. In reality, the level of black hit the 1nit mark, which is far from the ideal.

Although the AL1931 passed the tests less successfully than the other Acer, this is a solution of the same superb quality. It features a gorgeous design and abundance of connectors: if you want an LCD with video inputs, consider this model as an option.

The color profile for the Acer AL1931 display: al1931.icm.

 
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