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The image quality is subjectively the same as the L1750SQ delivers. Color gradients are reproduced flawlessly at the default settings, but banding occurs as soon as you reduce the contrast setting below the default value.

The gamma curves look nice, except for the darkest blue tones (the bottom left of the graph) where some colors are indistinguishable from pure black.

The response time graph doesn’t bring about any surprises. The matrix is rather slow, as the L1750SQ’s: the maximum point of the graph is lower, but the average response time is bigger.

The color temperature setup is surprisingly accurate. The monitor allows setting any standard color temperature from 5500K to 9300K without manual adjustment and the difference between temperatures of white and gray is small in all the modes.

The contrast ratio is satisfactory, too. The brightness characteristics of this model are almost the same as the L1717S’s and much better than the L1750SQ’s.

To tell you the truth, I hadn’t expected much from this monitor. After all, the L1750U is an entry-level model, so simplified that the developers even discarded a D-Sub connector. The monitor, however, proves to be not so bad. It is worth every cent of its price and even surpasses the more expensive L1750SQ at some points. In fact, the developers saved on the video cable alone; at least the characteristics of this model are no cheaper than those of the L1750SQ. So, the Flatron L1750U is going to make a good inexpensive monitor for typical office work, i.e. for text processing. It won’t disappoint you if you use it as such.

 
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