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Cross bands are visible in color gradients reproduced on this monitor, their number and the degree of visibility depending on the matrix brightness and the contrast settings. Frankly speaking, they are not really very conspicuous at any settings.

The gamma curves are almost perfect at the default settings. Alas, like with the previous monitor in this review, this one loses the darkest tones when the screen brightness is low.

The response time is what you can expect from a TN+Film matrix but without the characteristic decline at the end of the graph. There is no significant difference from the S75A.

The color temperature measurements produce similar results to those of the S75A, too. It’s all very well: there is such a small difference in temperatures of different shades of gray that you shouldn’t bother about it at all.

Alas, the contrast ratio of this monitor is very low, too. It is only a little better than the contrast ratio of the preceding model.

So, the Sony SDM-S75F differs from the SDM-S75A in functionality rather than in real characteristics. The S75F has a digital input, audio connectors, and screen height adjustment. But considering its higher price, I have bigger complaints than about the S75A: the monitor’s characteristics are too unassuming to be well compensated with the digital input and the new base alone.

 
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