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Color gradients are reproduced nicely at the default settings, but banding becomes perceptible at lower contrast settings. The width and number of the bands as well as how conspicuous they are depends on the specific settings of the monitor.

The color curves look fine. These are neat, smooth lines without any serious defects and lying quite close to the theoretical curves. The same is true for the reduced brightness/contrast settings – you don’t lose any of dark tones.

The monitor’s response time is quite typical for that type of the matrix. It is a couple of milliseconds faster than the BenQ FP737s-D on black-white transitions, but then a couple of milliseconds slower on mid-tone transitions.

The color temperature is set up badly in this monitor. There’s a big difference between temperatures of white and gray whatever setting you choose in the menu. The “warmest” setting gives you a more or less acceptable image for office work. At the rest of the settings the image looks definitely bluish.

The contrast ratio is, on the contrary, good for a TN+Film matrix, reaching 270:1. This is anyway lower than what you get with MVA matrixes, but quite acceptable already.

Like many other low-end LCD monitors, the Flatron L1717S has strong as well as weak points. It looks nice and has a good contrast ratio, but it lacks a digital input and has a sloppy color temperature setup. Still, you can view the L1717S as an entry-level model suitable for text processing in office. You should consider more serious offers if you’re shopping for a home monitor.

 
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