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Getting Started

The NAS supports both 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch disks. After you turn it on, you should use the QNAP Finder tool or the integrated web-server to install firmware on the disks (we installed version 3.4.1 Build 0315). The web-server may come in handy for users of alternative OSes or when you cannot use Finder for some reason. We guess it is for this useful feature that the high-capacity flash memory chip is necessary. The firmware installation process involves your setting up some basic NAS parameters such as admin password, time zone, network name, etc.

Besides looking for the device on the network, Finder can be used to change network settings, to turn on/reboot or check out the status of the NAS.

QNAP’s web-interface hasn’t changed much since the company’s earlier products. The first screen offers icons you can click on to access the device’s settings and active services (such as a media server or file download module).

The main setup screen has a classic layout with a menu tree on the left and a page with parameters in the middle. The color scheme can be switched from black to green or blue, which is in fact the only visual embellishment we could find. There are over 50 menu items, so the integrated search is going to come in handy. A help system is available. It should be useful for inexperienced users.

You can select the interface language manually if you don't like the language selected by default basing on your browser settings.

The encrypted HTTPS protocol can be used to ensure security when accessing the NAS via public networks. You can use your own security certificate for the NAS and choose any port number. The web-interface can be accessed not only by the administrator but also by an ordinary user (to change his/her password or access files).

 
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