Articles: Other
 

Bookmark and Share

(6) 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 ]

The quality of scanning black-and-white negative film will be exampled by the following image, digitized at the maximum optical resolution (4800dpi) with 48-bit color depth (in the color scanning mode). This is Kodak 5052 TMX film.


A scan of black-and-white negative film

The film grain is distinct at such a high scanning resolution. That’s the reason for me to use the Grain Reduction technology to show you the results of its work.


A scan without Grain Reduction


Another scan with Grain Reduction applied

I think this example is good at showing the effect of this technology. Note though that Grain Reduction noticeably reduces the image’s level of detail, so I won’t say it’s a perfect tool. You can do something much similar using the Blur filters in Photoshop, but what if you have numerous films to process?

The next example shows the quality of scanning color positive film. This time I’m interested not only in the quality of digitizing as it is, but also in how well Digital ICE for Films works with it.


Pay attention to the marked-out areas

After scanning with and without Digital ICE, I found out that this system is incorrect at working with my film (it was color positive Fuji RAP 100F film taken at random). The arrows show the areas of the snapshot which were considered by the system as if dirty, although there was no dirt there on the original. Thus, Digital ICE for Films is incompatible not only with Kodachrome 64 Professional, but with some other types of film, too. I guess additional info about compatibility should be sought on topical forums.

The next example shows the effect of the color restoration system:


That’s how color restoration works

Regrettably, I had no faded-out snapshot or slide on my hands, so I took normal (fresh) film. As you see in the figures above, the scanner’s color restoration technology works correctly. Note that the sky and the earth both have the natural color. My friend, a professional photographer, liked this result, too.

Now you can visually evaluate the quality of digitizing three types of originals: three color targets Kodak IT8.7/2 Q-60. The scanning parameters were set up in accordance with the three basic modes available in the exclusive EPSON Scan utility.

  • The scan of the 35mm slide of the Kodak IT8.7/2 Q-60E3A target in the Auto Exposure mode
  • The scan of the 35mm slide of the Kodak IT8.7/2 Q-60E3A target with an ICM profile applied
  • The scan of the 35mm slide of the Kodak IT8.7/2 Q-60E3A target in the No Color Correction mode
  • The scan of the 5x7 photograph of the KODAK IT8.7/2 Q-60R2 target in the Auto Exposure mode
  • The scan of the 5x7 photograph of the KODAK IT8.7/2 Q-60R2 target with an ICM profile applied
  • The scan of the 5x7 photograph of the KODAK IT8.7/2 Q-60R2 target in the No Color Correction mode
  • The scan of the 4x5 film of the KODAK IT8.7/2 Q-60E1 target in the Auto Exposure mode
  • The scan of the 4x5 film of the KODAK IT8.7/2 Q-60E1 target with an ICM profile applied
  • The scan of the 4x5 film of the KODAK IT8.7/2 Q-60E1 target in the No Color Correction mode
 
Pages: [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 ]

Discussion

Comments currently: 6
Discussion started: 07/10/04 11:49:50 AM
Latest comment: 02/27/06 11:07:30 AM

View comments

Add your Comment