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Performance in IOMeter

Sequential Read & Write Patterns

From the low-level IOMark to the synthetic IOMeter. IOMeter is sending a stream of read and write requests with a request queue depth of 4. The size of the requested data block is changed each minute, so that we could see the dependence of the drive’s sequential read/write speed on the size of the data block. This test is indicative of the maximum speed the drive can achieve.

The numeric data can be viewed in tables. We’ll discuss graphs and diagrams.

Oddly enough, the transition to the new platters does not bring any advantages in terms of linear speed. Perhaps we will see some benefits in the future, but so far the new drives are just as fast as their opponents based on 333GB platters. The 2TB WD Caviar Green is just a little bit ahead of its predecessor. The two new products from Seagate have the same speed which is just slightly higher than that of the 1TB Barracuda 7200.11 series model. They have improved in terms of processing small data blocks, though. The old 1TB model is slower than WD’s 5400rpm Green drives with 4KB and 8KB data blocks whereas the 1.5TB Barracuda 7200.11 drive is as fast as its WD opponents then. The Barracuda 7200.12 is even ahead of every other HDD with small data blocks and reaches its top speed on 4KB blocks.

The overall picture is similar to what we have seen at reading. The Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 is no faster than its opponents with small data blocks anymore, yet is still better than Seagate’s previous products.

 
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