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Performance in Intel IOMeter

Sequential Read & Write Patterns

IOMeter is sending a stream of read and write requests with a request queue depth of 4. The size of the requested data block is changed each minute, so that we could see the dependence of the drive’s sequential read/write speed on the size of the data block. This test is indicative of the maximum speed the drive can achieve.

The numeric data can be viewed in tables. We will be discussing graphs and diagrams.

The Hitachi 7K500 boasts the highest top speed in this test, outperforming the Seagate 7200.4 by a narrowest margin. Interestingly, the leaders reach their top speed on larger data blocks than the slower models.

As for the 5400RPM products, the 750GB Western Digital and the 640GB Samsung M7E come together to the finish although we expected the first drive with 375GB platters to come out the winner. Well, sequential speeds are not a strong point of Western Digital products: its 640GB drives are both somewhat slower than their opponents here.

We’ve got some good words to say about the Samsung M7E. It is the only drive to achieve its top speed on 4KB data blocks and is also fast at processing even smaller chunks of data.

Writing is overall similar to reading except for a couple of things. First, the Seagate 7200.4 falls behind the Hitachi 7K500 and differs but slightly from the 5400RPM drives. Second, the 640GB drive from Western Digital with Advanced Format is much better than its predecessor (BEVT) which is even inferior to the 500GB model.

 
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