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Performance in WinRAR

Now we are going to introduce to you one more interesting test in which we use WinRAR version 3.8 to compress and then uncompress a 1.13GB folder with 8118 files in 671 subfolders. The files are documents and images in various formats – the contents of a flash drive of an author of this review. These operations are done on the tested HDD. WinRAR is usually used to benchmark CPUs, but it can make a good test for HDDs if you select the lowest compression level and use a huge amount of files. The HDD’s performance should affect the speed of compressing/uncompressing then.

Unfortunately, we could not perform this test for the 3-platter Hitachi 5K500, Samsung M6 and Western Digital Scorpio Blue.

Does the HDD affect the performance of WinRAR? Yes. The difference of 45 seconds during archiving amounts to 7% of the total duration of the test (about 11 minutes). Perhaps that’s not something you should worry about, but anyway. Uncompressing takes less than 2 minutes and the difference between the HDDs is over half a minute, i.e. over 25%.

Now let’s analyze the results.

Archiving is a mixed load of sequential and random reading of very small files with subsequent writing of a single large file. The Seagate 7200.4 proves to be the best under this load. Three out of the five 5400rpm HDDs pass the test with similar results while the Toshiba and Seagate 5400.6 are slower than them.

When the archive is being unpacked, the HDD reads one large file and writes sequentially numerous small files. This test is won by the new Samsung but its advantage over the others is not large. We can only see that the Fujitsu is slow, probably due to its low speed of writing files.

 
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