Articles: Storage
 

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Testbed and Methods

The following testing utilities were used:

  • IOMeter 2003.02.15
  • WinBench 99 2.0
  • FC-Test 1.0

Testbed configuration:

  • Albatron PX865PE Pro mainboard
  • Intel Pentium 4 2.4GHz CPU
  • IBM DTLA-307015 system disk, 15GB
  • Radeon 7000 32MB graphics card
  • 256MB DDR SDRAM
  • Microsoft Windows 2000 with Service Pack 4

We installed the generic OS drivers for the drives and formatted them in FAT32 and NTFS as one partition with the default cluster size. For some tests 32GB partitions were created and formatted in FAT32 and NTFS with the default cluster size, too.

Performance in Intel IOMeter

Sequential Read & Write Patterns

IOMeter is sending a stream of read and write requests with a request queue depth of 4. The size of the requested data block is changed each minute, so that we could see how the drive’s sequential read/write speed depends on the size of the data block. This test is highly important for mobile storage devices as it emulates their most frequent operation mode.

The Fujitsu Handy Drive performs well in the sequential read test. Among the USB-interfaced models it is a little slower than the WD Passport on small data blocks and, after a minor slump on 32KB blocks, takes the lead on 64KB and larger data blocks, delivering a speed of over 30MB/s.

The Fujitsu looks worse at sequential writing. The results of the WD Passport, not to mention the HD-227FW with a FireWire interface, are much higher while the Fujitsu performs exactly like the other, slower, drives.

 
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