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Performance in Intel IOMeter

Sequential Read & Write

IOMeter is sending a stream of read and write requests with a request queue depth of 4. The size of the requested data block is changed each minute, so that we could see the dependence of the drive’s sequential read/write speed on the size of the data block. This test is indicative of the maximum speed the drive can achieve.

The numeric data can be viewed in tables. We will be discussing graphs and diagrams.

It is all very simple with sequential speeds: HDDs do not differ much within the same generation whereas a transition to higher-density platters, when a new generation arrives, leads to a considerable performance growth. Take note of the performance of the Seagate 15K7. It is indeed as high as 200MBps! Seagate has progressed in terms of firmware as well. The company’s older series are obviously slower than their opponents on small data blocks, but the 15K.6 and newer series go ahead.

The 10,000rpm NS.2 model is still as good as the senior models of the previous generation.

The standings do not change much when the HDDs do sequential writing. Seagate’s HDDs improve even more on small data blocks (8KB and smaller): the first two generations are obviously slower than their opponents whereas the newest two generations go ahead of their rivals.

Hitachi’s team is disappointing: even the latest 15K450 series is slow processing small data blocks. The 300GB Fujitsu MBA3 RC has some inexplicable problems with writing. Its speed is very low although its smaller-capacity series mates behave much better.

 
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