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Performance in Intel IOMeter

Sequential Read & Write Patterns

IOMeter is sending a stream of read and write requests with a request queue depth of 4. The size of the requested data block is changed each minute, so that we could see the dependence of the drive’s sequential read/write speed on the size of the data block. This test is indicative of the maximum speed the drive can achieve.

The numeric data can be viewed in tables. I will discuss graphs and diagrams.

IOMeter: Sequential Read results

These results agree with the previous test but the drives reach their top speeds with large data blocks only – 64 kilobytes and more. Take note that the eSATA and FireWire interfaces are more effective than USB with small data chunks, the FireWire even being ahead of the theoretically faster eSATA with data chunks of 512 bytes through 8 kilobytes.\

IOMeter: Sequential Write results

The XTreme model produces awful results at writing. Its controller must be unable to process large data blocks and has to cut them into smaller ones, reducing the processing speed. Perhaps its cache buffer is not large enough. It is all right with the other models: such write speeds are perfectly normal for a USB interface.

 
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