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Performance in Intel IOMeter

Sequential Read & Write Patterns

IOMeter is sending a stream of read and write requests with a request queue depth of 4. The size of the requested data block is changed each minute so that we could see the dependence of the drive’s sequential read/write speed on the size of the processed data block. This test is indicative of the maximum speed the drive can deliver.

The numeric data can be viewed in tables by clicking the links below. We will discuss graphs and diagrams.

The JMicron-based SSDs don’t look good against their opponents: the Kingston V series drives are both only as fast as 100 MBps, which is worse than what you can get from modern HDDs. Most of the SSDs come to the finish at speeds of 185 to 215 MBps, however. Intel’s and Wintec’s drives deliver the highest top speeds.

When processing small data blocks, the Intel X25-M is ahead too, followed by the Super Talent MasterDrive SX.

When it comes to sequential writing, the overall picture looks pretty different although we’ve got the same pair of losers: the controller of the Kingston V series drives cannot deliver more than 100 MBps at the peak and is also slow at processing small data chunks. Intel’s SSD has a rather low top speed but accelerates to it quicker than the other SSDs. The Wintec slows down on large data blocks for some reason, which may indicate some problems with multichannel memory access. The best results come from the Super Talent MasterDrive SX and the Kingston V+ series: the new controller from Toshiba looks highly promising!

 
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